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Remember faces but not names? You got it wrong.

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So, you think you're good at remembering faces, but terrible with names? New research has revealed we are actually better at remembering names than faces
The cringe-worthy experience of not being able to remember an acquaintance's name leads many of us to believe we are terrible with names. However, new research has revealed this intuition is misleading; we are actually better at remembering names than faces.
With the Christmas party season fast approaching, there will be plenty of opportunity to re-live the familiar, and excruciatingly-awkward, social situation of not being able to remember an acquaintance's name.

This cringe-worthy experience leads many of us to believe we are terrible at remembering names.

However, new research has revealed this intuition is misleading; we are actually better at remembering names than faces.

The authors of the study, from the University of York, suggest that when we castigate ourselves for forgetting someone's name we are placing unfai…

It tastes bitter, but we love it.

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Why we shouldn't like coffee, but we do Weirdly, people with a higher sensitivity to bitter caffeine taste drink more coffee
The more sensitive people are to the bitter taste of caffeine, the more coffee they drink, reports a new study. The sensitivity is based on genetics. Bitterness is natural warning system to protect us from harmful substances, so we really shouldn't like coffee. Scientists say people with heightened ability to detect coffee's bitterness learn to associate good things with it.

Why do we like the bitter taste of coffee? Bitterness evolved as a natural warning system to protect the body from harmful substances. By evolutionary logic, we should want to spit it out.

But, it turns out, the more sensitive people are to the bitter taste of caffeine, the more coffee they drink, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Australia. The sensitivity is caused by a genetic variant.

"You'd expect that peo…

Selective amnesia

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Two things in this story attracted my attention.

Mammals, especially us, have the ability to selectively forget things. 
Since I tend to forget things I'd rather remember, the first isn't really news.  Well, it is.  It's good news that we can selectively forget things.  Now if I could just selectively remember things.

And we're related to rats.  Slimey, stinky, vermin-infested, icky, blaaah rats.

Upon further consideration, this is not even a slight surprise.
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Selective amnesia: How rats and humans are able to forget distracting memories
Our ability to selectively forget distracting memories is shared with other mammals, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The discovery that rats and humans share a common active forgetting ability -- and in similar brain regions -- suggests that the capacity to forget plays a vital role in adapting mammalian species to their environments, and that its evolution may date back at least to the time of our …

'Good guys' in superhero films more violent than villains

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I don't want to say that screenwriters are to blame for this, but we are certainly complicit.  In the quest to create the next blockbuster (while creating a upward career path), resorting to violence to resolve situations is an easy out. 

While we could point the finger of blame at producers, studio heads and the money people behind them also want product that makes money, and violence often attracts larger audiences.  This is also true of theater owners and even merchandising company executives.

There is plenty of blame to go around.
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'Good guys' in superhero films more violent than villains New research found that protagonists in superhero films engage in more violent acts than the villains.

In a film genre more popular than ever, courageous superheroes wield special powers to protect the public from villains. But despite positive themes these films may offer, new research suggests superhero characters often idolized by young viewers may send a strongly negativ…

Who lives longer? The rich or the poor? And by how much?

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Wealth is just one factor in how long people live.

There's also happiness.  And so on.

Here's the report:
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Rich people don't live that much longer than the poor Economists take income mobility into account when calculating life expectancy
Differences in how many extra years rich people live compared to poor people is only about half of what we thought, according to new research.
New research results, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), challenge previous findings of huge differences in life expectancy between the rich and those at the bottom of the income scale. In real life people don´t necessarily stay poor or stay rich, as assumed in previous research, and three economists from the University of Copenhagen have now found a way to take this mobility between income-classes into account providing a more realistic way to calculate life expectancy for people from different walks of society. Their results show that in reality the diffe…

Unhappy in a relationship? Why do you stay?

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A story that may effect the development of your romantic comedies.  Why do people stay in unhappy relationships?  Simply put, it's concern for the partner of the unhappy person.

This research doesn't offer solutions to this situation, but does help our understanding of why people behave the way they do.

NOTE:  Within five minutes this post had 16 hits, the fastest hit rate of any story I've posted.  Might say something of how people feel.

Here's the story:
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When you are unhappy in a relationship, why do you stay?  The answer may surprise you. Study that finds it's not just the investment of time, resources and emotion
Why do people stay in unsatisfying romantic relationships? A new study suggests it may be because they view leaving as bad for their partner. The study, being published in the November 2018 issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, explored the possibility that people deciding whether to end a relationship consider not only …

Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think

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Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think Pursuing sex with an ex-partner does not always hinder breakup recovery
Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to the findings of a study in Springer's journal Archives of Sexual Behavior, having sex with an ex doesn't seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true even for those who continue to pine for their ex, says lead author Stephanie Spielmann of Wayne State University in the US.
For Spielmann, studying the potential costs of sleeping with an ex is of broad interest because sexual experiences with ex-partners are quite common across all age groups and relationship types. Together with her colleagues Spielmann devised two studies.

In one, the researchers analysed the daily experiences of 113 participants who had recently experienced a breakup. Two months later these participants comple…